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  • What is an Occupational Therapist?

    Eating, dressing, getting in and out of a chair. In the course of daily life, we use many skills to accomplish even “simple” tasks. Walking or using a fork is surprisingly complex. Nerve signals and muscles have to coordinate in a very specific order. A healthy body is a marvel! …Read More »
  • When Language Falls Apart

      One common outcome of a stroke or other brain injury is the sudden loss of ability to process language. This disability is called “aphasia” (ah-FAY-zya). Depending on which part of the brain has been damaged, the affected person may have trouble speaking or trouble understanding. Or may have difficulty …Read More »
  • Aging and the self-fulfilling prophecy

      “Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t—you’re right.” —Henry Ford It turns out this truism applies to the ways we perceive the aging process itself. Research shows that older adults who view aging as a time of continued learning and development are physically more resilient. They …Read More »
  • Fighting Parkinson’s with Exercise

    If your loved one has Parkinson’s disease, you have likely observed physical symptoms such as tremors, slowed movement, and poor balance. In addition to treatment with medication, evidence is mounting that exercise itself can reduce or delay progression of these symptoms. Even as little as 2.5 hours of physical activity …Read More »
  • Spiritual Advance Directive

      Every adult needs to complete an advance directive (and that means you, too!). It is the health care planning document that medical professionals follow if a patient becomes too ill to speak for him or herself. It gives your loved one the option to name someone as decision maker. …Read More »
  • When the worrying won’t stop

      Worry is useful when it calls us to action. But it’s a problem when it becomes an ongoing state of mind. It can become a habit, bringing tension and stress. If you’re a worrier, you may have mixed feelings. It may seem that worry keeps you on your toes, …Read More »
  • Managing Chronic Pain

    “Chronic pain” is pain that lasts for 12 weeks or more. The cause is usually nervous system misfiring, like a faulty car alarm system. Often there is no specific trigger, which makes treatment difficult. Chronic pain is common, affecting 50%–66% of adults age 50 and older. Opioid drugs are recommended …Read More »
  • Smartwatches for Seniors

      The makers of smartwatches are now designing products for older adults. And they just may have come up with an acceptable alternative to the standard “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” pendant. Perhaps you’ve tried to get your loved one to wear a personal emergency response system (PERS) …Read More »
  • Researching Treatments Online

    For those facing a serious—or even incurable—condition, the Internet can seem to be the last refuge of hope. But how can you distinguish a trustworthy website from that of a huckster? “Follow the money” is an important key for deciding if a website is truly unbiased. Start by asking yourself …Read More »
  • Age Friendly Kitchen

    Aging creates so many “new normals.” Even routine activities such as cooking may become challenging for your loved one. Balance issues can make reaching, bending, or lifting a problem. Arthritis often makes it difficult to maneuver pans and tools, turn on a faucet, or twist off lids. Extreme fatigue may …Read More »
  • Conserving Energy in the Face of Fatigue

    People with congestive heart failure (CHF) often tire easily, especially if they exert themselves. In CHF, the heart is swollen with fluids and cannot beat efficiently. The body’s cells then become hungry for oxygen. If your loved one has CHF, you witness this in his or her fatigue, shortness of …Read More »